Schedule 2016

conTENT with teaching CONtent?
Embracing Alternative Methodologies in the Modern Language Classroom

Today a variety of methods have become common to classrooms around Japan and the world. Whether classes involve the use of CLT, CBT, CLIL, ESP, or other methods, each brings with it a different set of challenges and rewards for teachers and students. This conference will encourage participants to explore different teaching methods, exchange thoughts and experiences regarding the use of the different methods, and explore suggestions for how to implement the different methods in a variety of classroom situations. Reports on research related to the various methods to deliver content course material will also be encouraged.

• Perspectives on communicative or content-based English instruction in Japan
• Innovative approaches to CLT, CLIL, CBT, and ESP
• Building support for CLIL or CBT within the university
• The role of ESP in content-based instruction

ESP informed Content-Based Learning: Suggestions for Keeping the Language in Learning

  • Anthony, Laurence - Center for English Language Education, Waseda University, Japan, Honorary Research Fellow, Lancaster University, UK.
  • 小ホール
  • 09:00-09:50

Plenary
Many institutions in Japan and other Asian countries are adopting Content-Based Learning (CBL) courses as an alternative to traditional English language programs. These courses are often taught by non-native subject specialists with little or no training in language teaching. As a result, students struggle to understand not only the new content but also the language in which it is being taught. Alternatively, English teachers may be asked to teach a CBL course, but this leads to the danger of them teaching overly simplistic or potentially inaccurate content material. In this presentation, I will review the core principles of the English for Specific Purposes (ESP) language learning approach and show how adopting these principles in a CBL classroom can help teachers to successfully balance content and language and produce courses that meet the target goals.  I will also discuss how ESP and CBL relate to other recent trends in tertiary program development, including English Medium Instruction (EMI) and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), and discuss the potential impact of all these trends on English language teachers, specialist subject teachers, and the tertiary institutions where they work.

Bio: Laurence Anthony is Professor of Applied Linguistics at the Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Japan. He has a BSc degree (Mathematical Physics) from the University of Manchester, UK, and MA (TESL/TEFL) and PhD (Applied Linguistics) degrees from the University of Birmingham, UK. He is a former director and current program coordinator at the Center for English Language Education (CELESE), Waseda University. His main interests are in English for Specific Purposes (ESP) program design and teaching methodologies, corpus linguistics, and educational technology. He is head of the ESP section of the JACET awards and publications committee and serves on the editorial boards of various international ESP journals. In 2012, he received the National Prize of the Japan Association for English Corpus Studies (JAECS) for his work on corpus software tools design.

A third revolution in ELT?: CLIL as a methodology for competency-based language education

  • Ikeda, Makoto - Sophia University
  • 小ホール
  • 13:00-13:50

Plenary
In this highly globalised information society, English is not just a basic tool to communicate with people from different linguistic backgrounds but an invaluable device to acquire new knowledge, produce original ideas and collaborate with other global citizens. This means it is not sufficient to develop students’ language knowledge and skills in the English classroom; their global (i.e. international and holistic) competencies should also be addressed. Here comes in CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning), whose ultimate goal is to nurture learners’ ‘soft skills’. In this talk, I will compare this innovative educational approach with other traditional ELT (English Language Teaching) methodologies, summarises its fundamental and advanced theories (principles and pedagogies), and present examples of both commercially produced and privately designed CLIL teaching materials.

Bio: Makoto Ikeda is professor of English philology and English language education at Sophia University. He received his MA from University of London and his PhD from Sophia University. He has published a number of articles and books on CLIL, and guest-edited a special issue of The International CLIL Research Journal focusing on CLIL in Japan. His recent publications include co-authored CLIL: New Challenges in Foreign Language Education at Sophia University, Vol. 3: Lessons and Materials, Sophia University Press (forthcoming).

POSTER PRESENATIONS
3rd Floor, E ラーニングサロン
14:00-14:50

General Union
Julia Kimura
The General Union is a legally registered labor union. Workers of any occupation or nationality are eligible to join, but we primarily organize foreign language teachers in the Kansai and Tokai regions. Since its foundation in 1991, our union has established a reputation for protecting members' rights and improving working conditions. We provide advice on workplace issues, and we actively help our members organize and negotiate in their workplaces.

Are you in the mood? Re-examining classroom atmosphere
Richard Gabbrielli, Yasuda Women's University
Classroom atmosphere underpins classroom interaction: a dramatic narrative involving a mutual coming together of humanity. In this session, I first explore the nature and function of classroom atmosphere and then invite participants to discuss its relevance to their own teaching contexts.

Foreign faculty integration and globalization
Thomas Nishikawa, Kyoto Sangyo University,
thomas.nishikawa@online.liverpool.ac.uk
The research examined tenured and non-tenured foreign faculty lack of integration into Japan’s universities. Initiatives to globalize universities have produced few results. One of the issues is the lack of genuine integration of the foreign faculty into domestic universities. The research investigated the rhetoric and reality of internationalizing Japan’s higher education.

Introducing English lecture meetings on science topics into the classroom
Keiichiro Kobayashi, Kanto Gakuin University,
kobakei@kanto-gakuin.ac.jp
2014より関東学院大学工学部に実施されている、ESP 的な要素を取り入れた英語授業(日本人の理工学専門教員による工学部学生を対象とした、理系のトピックに関する英語講演会)の実施
A presentation detailing activities in the department of engineering since the 2014 academic year, in which Japanese Faculty members, experts in their fields, have been invited to regular English classes as special lecturers to provide science-major students with up-to-date information on various scientific topics in English.

Using music as a medium of instruction
Etienne Marceau, Nagoya University of Foreign Studies,
marceau@nufs.ac.jp
Content-based education is gaining momentum in Japanese universities, as it teaches content while offering exposure to the second language. However, it is not always stimulating nor does it address the language pedagogically. This presentation offers practical ways of using music as a medium of instruction in content-based courses.

Applying content knowledge to a practical situation – example using the scientific method
Martin Wood, Kanazawa Institute of Technology,
martinwoodkit@gmail.com
Giving students the opportunity to apply content knowledge in a meaningful way may help students understand the material better. This poster will explain how students applied content knowledge from the scientific method to actual research conducted at our institution. Student feedback and suggestions for similar activities will also be explored.

Student-teacher conferences: Focusing on content?
Joe Garner, International Christian University, Tokyo,
gajoe@icu.ac.jp
As the direction of student-teacher conferences tends to be student driven, conferences may provide valuable insights into which aspects of language-embedded content courses students wish to explore in greater depth. Plans for researching this area will be outlined in this poster presentation.

Seven CBL activities using self-adhesive whiteboard film
Deborah Broadby, Nagoya College
Whiteboard films are a reusable lightweight alternative to conventional classroom boards that can stick to any hard surface. In this presentation, seven CBL activities will be explored through the use of these boards and attendees will gain ideas on how to incorporate them into content-based classes.

Influences of overseas experiences on L2 learning
Tetsuya Fukuda, International Christian University, Tokyo,
tfukuda@icu.ac.jp
About 300 university students at a university in Tokyo were divided into groups and compared to investigate the impact of living overseas before entering university on English learning. It was found that returnees, especially those from English-speaking countries, are generally better at English, and that non-returnees improve more in university.

Classroom culture before content: English can wait
Stephen Paton, Fukuoka University,
home@stevepaton.com
Many of our students are not accustomed to the kind of classroom communication that underpins modern communicative language teaching methods. Therefore, overcoming the non-communicative non-interactive classroom culture that they can bring with them is a necessary precursor to meaningful second language learning. I’ll show how I approach this situation.

schedule_2016

ESP informed Content-Based Learning: Suggestions for Keeping the Language in Learning

  • Anthony, Laurence - Center for English Language Education, Waseda University, Japan, Honorary Research Fellow, Lancaster University, UK.
  • 小ホール
  • 09:00-09:50

Plenary
Many institutions in Japan and other Asian countries are adopting Content-Based Learning (CBL) courses as an alternative to traditional English language programs. These courses are often taught by non-native subject specialists with little or no training in language teaching. As a result, students struggle to understand not only the new content but also the language in which it is being taught. Alternatively, English teachers may be asked to teach a CBL course, but this leads to the danger of them teaching overly simplistic or potentially inaccurate content material. In this presentation, I will review the core principles of the English for Specific Purposes (ESP) language learning approach and show how adopting these principles in a CBL classroom can help teachers to successfully balance content and language and produce courses that meet the target goals.  I will also discuss how ESP and CBL relate to other recent trends in tertiary program development, including English Medium Instruction (EMI) and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), and discuss the potential impact of all these trends on English language teachers, specialist subject teachers, and the tertiary institutions where they work.

Bio: Laurence Anthony is Professor of Applied Linguistics at the Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Japan. He has a BSc degree (Mathematical Physics) from the University of Manchester, UK, and MA (TESL/TEFL) and PhD (Applied Linguistics) degrees from the University of Birmingham, UK. He is a former director and current program coordinator at the Center for English Language Education (CELESE), Waseda University. His main interests are in English for Specific Purposes (ESP) program design and teaching methodologies, corpus linguistics, and educational technology. He is head of the ESP section of the JACET awards and publications committee and serves on the editorial boards of various international ESP journals. In 2012, he received the National Prize of the Japan Association for English Corpus Studies (JAECS) for his work on corpus software tools design.

Fact or opinion? Developing a critical reading perspective for English in the media
(ESP Presentation)

  • Malcolm Larking, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University, Oita,
    larkingm@apu.ac.jp
  • 2nd floor, room LL 201
  • 10:00-10:35

This presentation introduces practical reading strategies and activities for an English in the media ESP course. Empower your learners to read between the lines and critically disseminate the wide array of media reports available to them with these engaging and thought-provoking lesson ideas.

 “Reading Races” and other timely teaching tips

  • Ray Franklin
  • 3rd floor, room 301
  • 10:00-10:35

This workshop will present over two-dozen "timing tips" for use in the English classroom (with demonstrations using current textbooks), which can raise student awareness and provide more focus while adding lively and effective practice of almost any language teaching content or materials, at any level.

Research and development of support for the English needs in a small Japanese port town
(ESP Presentation)

  • Kazumi Kato, Tokai University, School of Marine Science and Technology
    Wendy Gough, Tokai University, School of Marine Science and Technology
  • 3rd floor, room 302
  • 10:00-10:35

Tokai University students help local volunteers interpret for luxury liner passengers at Shimizu Port. We are researching passenger and interpreter needs, and the support similar small towns offer foreign visitors. We will then create an ESP training program for the interpreters, and the city office to better meet passenger needs.

Creating alternative assessments for the university CLIL classroom: The lecture-genre
(ESP Presentation)

  • Vincent Petrin, Sophia University, Center for Language Education and Research,
    vincent9779@yahoo.com
  • 4th floor, room 4S1
  • 10:00-10:35

As university English education programs move towards more academic content approaches (e.g. CLIL), a need has arisen to create complementary assessments to traditional summative textbook exams. This presentation introduces the Academic-Professional Skills test aimed at providing a 90 minute integrated 4 skills assessment for the lecture-genre (ESP-ready).

Towards more intelligible research presentations
(ESP Presentation)

  • Paul McAleese, Nara Institute of Technology,
    paul@bs.naist.jp
  • 4th floor, room 4S2
  • 10:00-10:35

This short talk will consider the outcomes of an oral research presentation training program for post-graduate bio-science students. Based on final presentation evaluations, post-presentation questionnaires, and video material, some specific areas for further improving NNS (non-native speaker) presentation delivery and language are identified and discussed.

Take a detour out of the text into context
(ESP Presentation)

  • Caroline Bertorelli, Toyo University, Department of International Tourism, Tokyo,
    caroline@toyo.jp
  • 4th floor, room 4S3
  • 10:00-10:35

The presenter will share projects that have been successful in a compulsory English class for second-year university students majoring in tourism.

Autonomy, motivation, and reflection tasks

This presentation will discuss and share the methodology, materials and results of a study, carried out in a Japanese university freshman English communication course, which examined the perceived benefits to communication competence gained through participation in a number of highly-regarded self-evaluation activities.

Ideal classmates as content

  • Yoshifumi Fukada, Meisei University, Tokyo,
    fukayo2@hotmail.com
    Tetsuya Fukada, International Christian University, Tokyo
    Joseph Falout, Nihon University
  • 3rd floor, room 302
  • 10:45-11:20

The presenters will describe various ways to implement an awareness-raising process called Ideal Classmates Sensitizations (ICS), which encourages students to collaboratively support each other by sharing information about what they need from each other to perform well. Teachers can use ICS to better prepare their students for any classroom-based methodology.

 International Japanese history as CLIL

  • Thomas Lockley, Nihon University College of Law, Tokyo
  • 4th floor, room 4S1
  • 10:45-11:20

This paper will describe a variety of CLIL history courses focussing on Japanese international history. It will first briefly visit the conceptual framework behind course construction and explain the content and pedagogical methods employed. It will then examine the pedagogical and critical outcomes, including international posture.

Task-based teaching in a Japanese university context

  • Ingrid To, Nagoya University of Commerce and Business,
    ingridto@nucba.ac.jp
  • 4th floor, room 4S2
  • 10:45-11:20

This presentation will consider the application of task-based language teaching, alongside form-focused instruction, for lower-intermediate proficiency students in Japanese university classrooms.

Lecture courses for EFL students in Japan as study abroad preparation

This paper will describe the implementation of a lecture programme for EFL students in at a university in Japan. The presenter will describe the courses, some of the challenges that emerged, and the measures that were taken to develop the courses after feedback from both colleagues and students.

Speaking class with a speaking impaired student

In a university in Tokyo, a special needs student requested to join an elective conversation class with 25 other students. Effectively teaching a group while meeting the needs of a speaking and hearing-impaired person is a challenge and much can be learned from this case study.

Promoting maximum student involvement among diverse English levels in a content course

Although content courses are proven to be effective in improving language skills, varied English competency levels in a single classroom are problematic for instructors who do not wish to compromise the quality of their courses. This presentation demonstrates specific activities that can be applied to maximize participation in diverse classes.

 Using “Thread Voice” to give students a voice

  • Susan Laura Sullivan, Tokai University, School of Marine Science and Technology
  • 4th floor, room 4S1
  • 11:30-12:05

Implementing activities which draw on CBT, CLIL or EMI methodologies can be difficult, due to being required to teach from set course books. This presentation explores using “Voice Thread,” an online interactive and collaborative tool, which enabled students to exploit and supplement textbook ideas on story-telling techniques.

Integrating content and presentation skills

  • Eric Hirata, Nagoya University of Foreign Studies,
    eric@nufs.ac.jp
    Jeremiah Hall, Nagoya University of Foreign Studies,
    jhall@nufs.ac.jp
  • 4th floor, room 4S2
  • 11:30-12:05

The presenters will address best practices for integrating content and presentation skills into EFL courses to improve student communicative competence. They will share strategies for adapting course materials to include content and presentation skills while meeting course objectives. Participants will receive access to sample course materials.

Curriculum’s effect on foreign language anxiety

  • Robert Dykes, University of Fukui
  • 4th floor, room 4S3
  • 11:30-12:05

This presentation will cover a completed, and ongoing follow-up, research project to examine a gap in foreign language anxiety research: measuring the change of FLA over the medium and long term in a university context focusing on a commutative-oriented curriculum versus a reading and TOEIC-oriented curriculum.

A third revolution in ELT?: CLIL as a methodology for competency-based language education

  • Ikeda, Makoto - Sophia University
  • 小ホール
  • 13:00-13:50

Plenary
In this highly globalised information society, English is not just a basic tool to communicate with people from different linguistic backgrounds but an invaluable device to acquire new knowledge, produce original ideas and collaborate with other global citizens. This means it is not sufficient to develop students’ language knowledge and skills in the English classroom; their global (i.e. international and holistic) competencies should also be addressed. Here comes in CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning), whose ultimate goal is to nurture learners’ ‘soft skills’. In this talk, I will compare this innovative educational approach with other traditional ELT (English Language Teaching) methodologies, summarises its fundamental and advanced theories (principles and pedagogies), and present examples of both commercially produced and privately designed CLIL teaching materials.

Bio: Makoto Ikeda is professor of English philology and English language education at Sophia University. He received his MA from University of London and his PhD from Sophia University. He has published a number of articles and books on CLIL, and guest-edited a special issue of The International CLIL Research Journal focusing on CLIL in Japan. His recent publications include co-authored CLIL: New Challenges in Foreign Language Education at Sophia University, Vol. 3: Lessons and Materials, Sophia University Press (forthcoming).

Scaffolding ideas for the CLIL classroom
(Long Presentation)

This presentation seeks to give practical examples of scaffolding in humanities content. Techniques, utilized to good effect by the presenter, will be introduced. Techniques include interventions with course material and activities, classroom layout and practices, as well as homework and assignments. Attendees are encouraged to share their opinions and experiences.

Smartphone movies: Dynamic, task-based learning for college students
(Long Presentation)*

This workshop will explain and demonstrate the simplicity, power and dynamic range of learning activities through movie production, now available with the most recent developments of smartphone and 'cloud' technology. Attendees should have a reasonable knowledge of smartphones and smartphone applications, however there is no requirement to bring a smartphone to the workshop. Please note: iOS and Apple Store products such as iMovie will be demonstrated.
*For this workshop presentation, the tech level required is novice to intermediate

Comparing multiple intelligences in ESP nursing classes- a comparative study
(Long Presentation)

This interactive presentation will discuss the application of MI principles to promote learner-centered instruction in first year university ESP courses for nursing students in two universities. Results from case studies demonstrated that regardless of English proficiency level, students in both universities possessed similar MI levels. With practical examples offered, presentation participants will be given an opportunity to see how knowledge of students’ MI strengths and weaknesses may be utilized to transform and improve their own English instruction.

From needs analysis to language center: CALL for change at Osaka University

A comprehensive needs analysis was conducted to assess the English language needs and difficulties of undergraduate Japanese EFL learners at Osaka University. The findings revealed that there is a pressing need for launching a CALL-based language center at this university which could contribute to the status of ELT.

What lies beneath: The hidden processes of spoken language

Many of the processes by which spoken language works are invisible to language users. In conversation, repair, hesitations, restarts, discourse markers and so on are not consciously attended to during interactions. It is proposed that these hidden aspects of language influence teaching in far-reaching ways.

Developing academic writing skills through Literature Circles

  • Eric Hirata, Nagoya University of Foreign Studies,
    eric@nufs.ac.jp
  • 3rd floor, room 302
  • 15:00-15:35

The presenter will describe how an adapted form of Literature Circles, previously successful in EFL reading classes, can be applied to EFL academic writing classes. Applying redesigned Literature Circles to focus on specific writing skills such as summarizing, researching, and referencing improves overall academic writing performance will be explored.

 Trains leaving stations: A language teacher gets on board with CLIL

  • Quenby Aoki Hoffman, Sophia University,
    quenbya@yahoo.com
  • 4th floor, room 4S1
  • 15:00-15:35

This presentation explores ways that teachers can use their skills and experience as language teachers trained in TESOL or Applied Linguistics to teach CLIL and other Content-Based courses. Specific examples and materials will be provided from classes the presenter has taught, including Psychology, Environmental Problems, Gender Studies, and Multiethnic Literature.

Assessing the challenge of unscripted listenings

Twelve Japanese university EFL listeners of three different proficiency levels watched short unscripted video clips of two different native English speakers talking about
learning to drive. A verbal recall procedure with participants revealed a variety of difficulties, including misinterpretations of connected speech, hesitations, cultural references, and known vocabulary.

L2 self-confidence and identity development

  • Brian Wojtowicz, Kwansei Gakuin University (Language Center), Hyogo,
    b_wojo@hotmail.com
  • 4th floor, room 4S3
  • 15:00-15:35

The presenter will discuss research results that show how learner self-reflective analysis of videoed conversations positively affected L2 self-confidence levels. Students self-evaluated their own topic-less paired L2 discussions with emphasis on identifying personal satisfaction of communicative output, individual strengths, weaknesses, desired improvements, and achieved improvements.

Using non-fiction graded readers to bring content to skills-based courses

Skills course books can often be lacking in textual content. If teachers know the learning objectives of their courses and have a repertoire of activities, they can create their own content-rich curriculum and materials by adapting non-fiction graded readers. The presentation will show how this was done for a listening/pronunciation course.

When do we stop teaching English?

The presentation will discuss the need for universities to shift from courses that emphasize language learning to ones that emphasize language usage. The presentation will show that, given an environment that nurtures critical thinking, students can engage in complex issues in their adopted second language.

Peer review: A supplementary method in university classes in Japan

  • Chih Hao Chang, Nagoya University of Commerce and Business
  • 3rd floor, room 302
  • 15:45-16:20

This presentation aims to summarize the pros and cons of peer review and to provide suggestions for before, during, and after peer review. By adopting peer review in writing classes, not only are teachers relieved of the time-consuming tasks of correcting students’ writing, but more importantly, students learn more effectively by active participation.

Managing a content-based curriculum

  • Tamara Swenson, Osaka Jogakuin University,
    t1swenson@wilmina.ac.jp
    Steve Cornwell, Osaka Jogakuin University
  • 4th floor, room 4S1
  • 15:45-16:20

The presenters will share their expertise in designing, writing, and maintaining materials for a CBI curriculum at a Japanese university. The university began content-based instruction in the late-1980s.Two challenges are supervising faculty as they develop first year materials in-house and linking content and language goals.

Content learning and identity development

This presentation explores the intersections between identity formation, content-focused learning, and second language acquisition. In acquiring a second or foreign language, there is an aspect of identity formation that will accompany the experience. This presentation is focused on how to foster and utilize identity formation in the content-focused language classroom.

An author's guide for publishing in OnCUE Journal
(Long Presentation)

  • Glen Hill, Chief editor of OnCUE Journal, Obihiro University,
    glenahill@gmail.com
  • 4th floor, room 4S3
  • 15:45-16:35

This talk will provide detailed information on the sections of OnCUE Journal for potential authors. In addition to explaining what section editors see as vital material, the presentation will demonstrate what writing weaknesses to avoid. The overall submission process will also be described with tips on dos and don’ts.

Sleep habits of tertiary-level Japanese ELLs

  • Josh Brunotte, Nagoya College,
    JoshBrunotte@gmail.com
    Deborah Broadby, Nagoya College
  • 3rd floor, room 301
  • 16:35-17:10

All teaching techniques are more effective if students are mentally and physically prepared for class. Data will be presented on the sleep habits of Japanese ELLs and their rationale for sleep choices. Suggestions for how instructors might encourage better sleep-related choices through modern teaching techniques will also be discussed.

Word association in Japanese learners of English

Word association tests offer an understanding of thought processes. This presentation describes one test of English language learners, who showed a preference for syntagmatic word choices, in particular those experiential, collocational or phonological in nature. Using such information, teachers can consider how to encourage learners to develop their mental lexicon.

Discussing entertainment: Student-directed content instruction

Content-based English classes can be engaging and thought provoking when students are interested in the topic. The presenter will discuss an entertainment-themed course where students determined course content and acted as teachers to their classmates. The presentation examines student opinions regarding this format and gives suggestions for implementing similar syllabi.

Multicultural education in the Japanese university classroom – A Native American story

Creating "world citizens" is the current goal du jour of many university English language programs in Japan. This presentation will outline a necessary first step in this process—multicultural education—explain its necessity in current Japanese society, and provide materials and activitie